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In The Footsteps Of Our Ancestors

Nov
9
@
3:30 pm
Followed by Q&A with:
No items found.
Screened in
2019
at the

Director: Nicholas Castel
Runtime: 60 minutes
County of origin: Canada

What many call the ‘worlds toughest hike’, the Canol Heritage Trail is a 355km rugged alpine path that weaves its way through vast canyons, rivers and thicket deep within the Mackenzie Mountains of the Sahtú region, NWT. In The Footsteps Of Our Ancestors is an epic documentary feature that follows the journey of 11 brave hikers during a 37-mile traverse of the trail as part of the 2017 Canol Youth Leadership Hike.

Tracing the abandoned remains of the Canol Pipeline project, one of World War II's failed energy pursuits, the diverse team of youth, elders and community guides walk in the footsteps of the Shúhtagot’ı̨nę Mountain Dene, the Indigenous stewards of the land since time immemorial.

Faced with some of the most beautiful and unforgiving wilderness found in Canada, the team quickly understand what the realities of life in the mountains would have been like for their Sahtú Dene and Métis ancestors and the difficulties faced by the American Army in building one of the greatest constructions projects of the 20th century. 

With each foot placed in front of the other, the hikers reveal an enduring message for future generations and showcase the power of youth leadership, the spirit of teamwork, and the tremendous potential we unlock inside ourselves when we are chosen by the land.

Sponsored by:


Eskimo Inc.

Director: Max Baring
Runtime: 17 minutes
County of origin: USA

The Inupiaq people of the north slope of Alaska are in the front row facing climate change, but they are also sitting on the biggest oil and gas deposits in North America. Is the native corporation, set up after the Alaska Native Claims Settlement, fit for purpose as the Inupiaq try to balance conservation and development?

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